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India teen tells US how to save $400 million by changing font (via The Hindu)

A 14-year-old Indian-origin boy has come up with a unique plan that could help the U.S. save nearly $400 million a year by merely changing the font used on official documents.

Suvir Mirchandani, a student in a Pittsburgh-area middle school, claimed that if the federal government used the Garamond font exclusively it could save about $136 million per year, nearly 30 per cent less than the estimated $467 dollars it spends annually on ink.

An additional $234 million could be saved annually if state governments also implemented the change.

Mirchandani said the idea came to him when he was trying to think of ways to cut waste and save money as part of a science fair project at his school, CNN reported.

The youngster noticed that he was getting a lot more handouts than he did in elementary school and decided to figure out if he could minimize use of paper and ink.

While recycling paper was one way to save money and conserve resources, Mirchandani said little attention had been paid to the ink used on the papers.

“Ink is two times more expensive than French perfume by volume,” he said, adding that he then decided to focus his project on finding ways to cut down the cost of ink.

As part of his experiment, he collected random samples of teachers’ handouts and focused on the most commonly used characters such as e, t, a, o and r.

He noted how often each character was used in different fonts like Garamond, Times New Roman, Century Gothic and Comic Sans and then measured how much ink was used for each letter, using an ink coverage software.

From his analysis, Mirchandani figured out that by using the Garamond font with its thinner strokes, his school district could reduce its ink consumption by 24 per cent and in turn save as much as $21,000 annually.

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He repeated his tests on five sample pages from documents on the Government Printing Office website and got similar results that changing the font would save money.

Mirchandani’s findings have been published in the Journal for Emerging Investigators (JEI), a publication founded by a group of Harvard students in 2011 that provides a platform for the work of middle school and high school students.

One of the journal’s founders Sarah Fankhauser said that of the nearly 200 submissions they have received since 2011, Mirchandani’s project stood out.

“We were so impressed. We really could really see the real-world application in Suvir’s paper,” Fankhauser was quoted as saying…”

If you build a city that is great for an eight-year-old and for an 80-year-old, then you build a city that is going to be great for everybody. They’re like an indicator species. We need to stop building cities as if everybody in them is 30 years old and athletic.

Gil Penalosa, the "pied piper for sustainable transportation," quoted in a Globe & Mail profile. 

Photo: The Atlantic Cities

(via plantedcity)

katarinaprior:

As Art Production Fund Artist-in-Residence, Candy Chang lived in the The Cosmopolitan and turned its P3 Studio gallery into a contemplative experiment around anonymity, vulnerability, and understanding in the heart of the Las Vegas strip. Visitors were invited to submit their confessions on wooden plaques in the privacy of confession booths. She hung the anonymous plaques on the gallery walls so they gathered over time like a Shinto Shrine prayer wall. She projected and painted select responses on large canvases. The space featured an original soundtrack by Oliver Blank.

Click HERE for more work by Candy Chang 

ccephalopod:

therhumboogie:

The Arte Sella, looks to be one of the most magical, fairytale woodlands in the world. Since 1986 this astounding destination in the Sella Valley in Italy has been dotting the landscape with the amazing works of over 200 contemporary artists from all over the world. A future holiday destination for sure!

This is magical

etsy:

"I use the name “gazing bowls” because the word gaze is often indicative of wonder, fascination and awe. Like a rescinding tide or desert after a rain storm, when the bowls are filled with water the color and patterns change. When I look into these bowls I feel as if they transform before my eyes, like staring at the ocean or the sky after a storm. These bowls can serve many purposes; resonant healing objects, meditation, a vessel for your favorite treasures or eye candy. My son loves to use them for our ever-expanding cabinet of curiosities." — Riley Salyards

Read more» Fresh Shop: Swift & Roe | The Etsy Blog

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Architecture with Heart: Exploring the Work of Shigeru Ban

For more photos and videos from Shigeru Ban’s structures around the world, explore the Centre Pompidou-Metz and Cardboard Cathedral location pages and browse the #shigeruban hashtag.

For modernist architect Shigeru Ban, the art of structural design isn’t just an exercise in aesthetics, but rather a means of solving important problems during humanitarian crises.

Though Ban stands as the mind behind iconic structures such as the Centre Pompidou-Metz in Lorraine, France, its his temporary structures that have perhaps garnered the most recognition, earning him this year’s Pritzker Architecture Prize, the most prestigious honor in the field of modern architecture.

In the wake of massive crises, Ban has lent his skills to designing temporary structures that bring both shelter and beauty to people in need. He has worked with the UN to design refugee shelters for displaced populations in countries like Turkey and Rwanda and has even built two temporary churches in cities shaken my natural disasters. After a powerful quake struck the city of Christchurch, New Zealand, in 2011 and severely damaged the city’s iconic 19th-century cathedral, Ban worked with local firm Warren and Mahoney to build the Cardboard Cathedral. The stunning, A-frame structure was made primarily out of cardboard tubing and paper, Ban predominant materials that are both cheaply accessible during times of crisis and are largely recyclable when the buildings come down.

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